This Means More

April 9, 2014 at 3:51pm
21 notes
Reblogged from spraynardband

Here’s Where I Put Spraynard On Blast And No One Wants To Hear It

spraynardband:

NEW SONG. I’M LATE FOR WORK BUT I’M STILL GOING TO GO TO WAWA MY LIFE RULES.

*dons DIY zinester punk polemic fedora*

Alright, so I know it’s not really cool to put musicians on blast anymore for decisions they apparently have no other choice to make, but I think that isn’t always exactly true, and potentially allows for destructive shit to happen. In summary, Noisey sucks and there is no reason Spraynard, who come from DIY punk and were very vocal about being ethical and having ideals, and who also have a massive audience they can reach directly, to premiere a track with them. Three years ago when their last record came out, it wouldn’t have even been a question but now we live in an age where shit like this happens and it makes me miss If You Make It. Read on or don’t! xo

Read More

9:30am
23 notes
Reblogged from talkingfetalhorse

andrewtsks:

talkingfetalhorse:

andrewtsks:

talkingfetalhorse:

if aliens were to drop by for a visit tomorrow and ask “what is the most critically acclaimed genre of earth music at the moment?” i would have no choice but to answer “pop-punk and its derivatives”

Except, like, half of these are hardcore bands! I am specifically referring to Touche Amore, La Dispute, Johnny Foreigner, Crime In Stereo, and probably Make Do And Mend as well. I’ll totally get onboard the “hardcore = punk” bandwagon, but declaring them as derivatives of pop-punk is a bridge too far for me.

Yeah, I know, splittinghairs.jpg, but I’m too much of a nerd not to sometimes.

that is true

the only real pop-punk bands are wonder years and state champs, but all of them fall into a similar, accessible spectrum of related bands and are covered by the same publications, so i felt comfortable lumping them together as either pop-punk or tangentially related to pop-punk. and my favourite crime in stereo and touche amore songs are the poppiest, so their more abrasive leanings are sometimes lost; for me, pop-punk is largely a synonym for “punk”, as it’s the subtype of punk i’m drawn to first. i’d disagree on the johnny foreigner = hardcore categorization though.

that wonder years / defeater (p.s. letters home? 81) / citizen / modern baseball / real friends tour comprised two pop-punk bands, one hardcore band, one post-grunge band, and one emo band, but at the show i went to (had defeater not pulled out) i doubt it would have mattered. if you’re a fan of one, you’re likely a fan of all.

Fair enough, sounds like we pretty much agree in the end—though I definitely didn’t come to punk through pop-punk. That’s something we don’t have in common, but it’s probably just down to a difference in age, though. Kids I knew who were like 5 years younger than me all started out with NoFX and Green Day as their first punk bands, so it makes sense. 

I’m guilty of doing the same thing with Johnny Foreigner as you’re doing with Crime In Stereo/Touche Amore—categorizing them by personal context rather than sound. The fact that, to me, I hear that recent wave of UK/Irish stuff like them, Dananananaykroyd, Fight Like Apes, and a few others as descended from bands generally seen (at least at the time) as post-hardcore, such as Q And Not U, At The Drive In, or maybe even Saetia a little bit, makes me see them as a post-hardcore band as well, and since I’m honestly trying to get rid of the “post-” designation in my personal categorization of music lately, I just shorthanded those bands as hardcore bands. I’m probably the only person who sees them that way, though.

Regardless, you’re right—all those bands you’re talking about are huge right now, and they’re all popular with the same people. If you want the REAL common denominator for all of these bands, though, it’s not pop-punk: it’s emo. I just think “emo” has become a dirty word with younger kids these days because they all associate it with music that was popular when they were 12 or whatever and that they feel too cool to still be identified with now. In their minds, they see it as a commercial trend that’s now passe, not an underground musical phenomenon with 30 or so years of history, so it’s tainted or whatever. Not that it hasn’t always had a stigma—and for good reasons, really—it’s just the stigma used to be completely different.

This is as good a place as any to pitch an idea, and I am not the only person to have thought of this, but, that Life Without Buildings is this weird missing link between twinkly middle-American emo/math rock, and the UK. Like, this absolutely could be an American Football song, except instead of the sad boy vox, you have this woman making a beautiful and inscrutable sound poem.

March 13, 2014 at 2:51pm
18 notes
Reblogged from juanalikesmusic

andrewtsks:

juanalikesmusic:

Tbh this is my favorite replacements album because it sounds like goo goo dolls

This is exactly what I thought while listening to it — and maybe the reason why I didn’t like it. 

Hahaha the good Goo Goo Dolls albums are way better than that Replacements album. And wolfpartyjoe, if that’s seriously your favorite Replacements album we need to have a conversation.

Just so everyone else understand my frame of reference, here are some helpful links:

good Goo Goo Dolls vs bad Goo Goo Dolls

good Replacements vs bad Replacements

Bad Replacements is still pretty OK, whereas bad Goo Goo Dolls is terrible. Good Replacements is better than good Goo Goo Dolls, but both bands are capable of being VERY good when they want to be.

I feel like this is totally an issue of age and when we grew up, but then again tons of my peers are (proclaimed) huge Replacements fans. When I first heard All Shook Down, (CD purloined from my dad’s youngest brother’s old bedroom,) that band *finally* clicked for me in a big way, mostly because it sounded so much like their 90s progeny. I heard All Shook Down and I could draw lines to… Gin Blossoms and Goo Goo Dolls, who I had been subjected to like eight times a day on modern rock radio. Because I am fond of those bands and enjoy them, if only through the war of attrition they waged on my eardrums, I was psyched. If anyone can direct me to something that details how those bands watered down the Replacements sound ‘til it was fit for the dentist’s office, let me know. It seems ripe for exploring. 

As for the rest of the Replacements catalog, I think their singles kick ass but as a whole I think their albums are uneven as hell and are overrated. Lay it on me! Or, better yet, just educate me.

March 12, 2014 at 12:12pm
0 notes

(Source: Spotify)

11:58am
11 notes

"Something Wasn’t Working, I’m On New Start Again"

I’m listening to New Start Again, and I’m realizing one thing that I think attracts me to Dick Diver, and that sets them apart from American bands of their stature and attitude, is there’s no fucking chorus pedal or digital reverb. I also think dolewave is much more interesting than like the Captured Tracks/Woodsist school of chill and lazy indie…to my knowledge, none of these performers are the fashion model spawn
of Conde-Nast editors. In America, we millenials also obsess over the television show Girls, the success of which is the product of nepotism as much as it is its merit-worthy/”generation-defining” stories. There is no apparent upward mobility for my friends and I at the moment, so I don’t know why we find stuff like that so attractive when really we should be frustrated. 

I am not qualified to dive into what sets Australia’s young adults apart from America’s or the economic factors that are driving the dolewave tag. That’s already been done extensively and is probably best covered in these three articles. But I do think it’s really interesting that while an heiress to a nine-figure fortune is being championed in the American music press as a DIY artist with no second thought, the Australian press is actually investigating economic and social forces that are informing bands like Dick Diver and Bitch Prefect. jakec can correct me if I’m wrong, but some of the members of these bands are, like, literally on the dole right? 

I’m also thinking, not to waste more brain cells on Zachary Cole Smith, but how his attempt to emulate the working class slack of Kurt Cobain is an interesting counter to the Bed Wettin’ Bad Boys’ unironic embrace of “success rock.” Not that DIIV and BWBB occupy the same place in indie rock for most people at all. But thanks to the internet, I now have the ability to choose between the "why me, I’m so famous now, I know how He felt," of ZCS and the sincerity of what the Bad Boys do. I cannot for the life of me find it now, but there was an interview on some blog with BWBB in which they make clear that their declaration of success rock is not sarcastic, that they truly aspire to success and something bigger, and that the album title Ready For Boredom was not something nihilistic or Wavvesian, but rather referred to having had so much excitement and worked so hard that boredom was a well deserved break from it all.

Outside all the talk of dolewave, I’m interested to know how these bands are marketed in Australia. Is there anything like the celeb gossip rag coverage Sky Ferreira and Zac Cole Smith get with Woolen Kits? Or does nowhere in the world match our thirst for anointing People Who Are Better And More Exciting And More Beautiful Than Us? Are the UV Race playing Melbourne’s answer to House Of Vans? 

Maybe I’m drawing false, like, battle lines or distinctions here, when all I’m trying to say is I fucking love Australian guitar music.

Also, take all this with a grain of salt because it took a few listens for me to realize that Newstart is part of Australia’s social security. 

March 10, 2014 at 12:09pm
8 notes
Reblogged from decanting-cerebral

They Help And They Don't: Dana Spiotta Writes Of Food Stamps →

decanting-cerebral:

image

[taken from Dana Spiotta’s 2001 novel “Stone Arabia”. Narrator is leading character Denise Kranis] 

1.  "Food stamps, don’t kid yourself, they help and they don’t.

When I was pregnant with Ada, they asked me if I wanted WIC coupons. (I don’t remember what WIC stood for. Women in Calamity? Wombs in Crisis? Whiners in Christ?) They told me my income qualified me for WIC pre- and postnatal care and WIC essential food items. I used them for a long time.

I got cheese and juice, and later, after she was born and I discovered that my postpartum migraine meds made it a problem to breastfeed, I used WIC for the very expensive formula Ada required. I needed the help.

2.  But the coupons were a pain. Each month you had to pick them up in person. You could only go to the supermarkets that accepted them. You could only buy certain things with them. And everyone in line saw you use them. And you knew whatever else you bought (God forbid you bought cigarettes or beer or even a candy bar), even though you paid your own money for it, would be scrutinized by everyone in line.

It didn’t have to go like that — but it did, and the message was clear to me. I used to drive all the way over to the west side so I could use the Albertson’s there. I dreaded running into people I knew.

First I had to get someone to open the locked case where the formula was kept. (I never asked why baby formula had to be kept in a locked case. I din’t want to know.) Then I felt helpless as I watched the checkout girl sigh when I showed her the coupons — using them was a complicated transaction involving signatures and product codes and manager approvals. 

More than once I would drive out of my way, find the smallest line, go last, and then discreetly hand over the coupon to have the checkout girl call over the intercom loudspeaker for the manager and then wait, holding up the line as the girl held my coupons aloft.

3.  Later, when I got health insurance through another state program, one that issued a regular insurance card that didn’t identify how it was funded, I remember how the nurse at my doctor’s office asked me, “WIC, right?” I said no, and I handed her my new insurance card, and she said, “Good for you!” with a big smile. I smiled back, because what else was I supposed to do?

So the food stamps may not have been the whole story, but they certainly made up some significant chunk of the story.”

— Dana Spiotta, from “Stone Arabia: A Novel,” Scribner, 2011

Stone Arabia is the best book I’ve read in the last five years. Dana Spiotta tries to solve (or clarify, or something) the lack of understanding between my parents’ generation and mine, and then between that of my parents and their parents… while also writing fiction about pop music that actually sounds knowledgeable of the history and figures within of pop music. I loved A Visit From The Goon Squad and its fictional account of the Bay Area punk scene but I couldn’t help but feel like no one would ever name their band the Flaming Dildoes (or whatever Bennie’s band was,) and then cringe a little bit because I’m a total wiener about music and I would actually let something like that make me cringe. I don’t think any of Jenifer Egan’s music industry people were as well-written as Denise’s reclusive musician brother Nik. 

Anyway, more importantly if you are hung up on the differences (and/or important similarities) among “the greatest generation,” the baby boom and our own, Stone Arabia, Eat The Document and Lightning Field are sort of about that I think and are pretty much numbers one through three of my top five favorite books. This portion of the book was cool because it reminds me of something a parent would have gone through and not told you about for most of your life because they have to maintain this illusion of strength and infallibility… I think I saw, in my own life anyway, these illusions get holes poked in them since the recession and it’s been educational and eventually really good. 

Did you read this book? 

March 7, 2014 at 3:11pm
12 notes
Reblogged from wolfpartyjoe

Receiving Room →

wolfpartyjoe:

wolfpartyjoe:

Hey. I made this website, like, totally by hand or something. I’ve even been uploading my files using SSH in the Linux Command Line and I feel like a hacker.

It has a zine I finished in January with the help of seanhaughton called Receiving Room. It has interviews with Drag Ur World, Manors, Lemuria, Losing Sleep and T-Shirt Weather. I’m working on a spring issue.

There’s a forthcoming podcast with stumblingandburbling. Trying to edit it in Audacity actually was making me nauseous so I stopped and I’ve been too afraid to finish it but I’m going to, so Ben and I can be stars. 

There’s also a blog on there that I made. No disrespect to tumblr, I just wanted to try something where I didn’t know how many people were paying attention, in an effort to stop caring whether or not people are paying attention. 

It has nothing fancy like jscript or cool fonts because I don’t know how to do that yet. It’s probably not even pleasing to the eye because the font is huge and I don’t really know how much padding the human eye likes. But check it out and maybe do something similar yourself. 

Apropos of nothing, I found this article really well-verbalized a lot of concerns I have from my lonely mailroom about “the way things are” and if you haven’t read it yet, you should. From an earlier interview with the writer of the piece, Anne Elizabeth Moore:

That “funding cool stuff” argument I think is bit of a load of crap, because these “cool” companies may well be funding stuff that would not otherwise have happened, but there’s a really good chance that something interesting — although not sponsored — would have happened in its stead. I mean, from an artistic standpoint, I do have to say, a lot of these companies come in and fund this stuff, right, but they don’t find the best person to do it, they find the best self-promoter to do it, because they are lazy and so their job is that much easier later, and because they don’t want to actually find someone super talented, they just want to find someone, because this is not an event about merit, it’s an event about branding. And then what do we end up with? A “cool” company funding some crappy event that, true, might not otherwise have happened. And then, looking at it a little more deeply, often that someone they find resembles what the corporate world will think of as “edgy”: maybe a straight white male, right — but one with tattoos. At least that’s the way it often goes down here in Chicago. That’s the guy that gets offered the deal. So the whole thing quickly perpetuates the sexist and racist stuff we see coming out of corporate media, but now it’s in the real world. It’s just as staged, though.

Lol wait the zine isn’t working give me a sec.

Ok now go.

3:06pm
12 notes
Reblogged from wolfpartyjoe

Receiving Room →

wolfpartyjoe:

Hey. I made this website, like, totally by hand or something. I’ve even been uploading my files using SSH in the Linux Command Line and I feel like a hacker.

It has a zine I finished in January with the help of seanhaughton called Receiving Room. It has interviews with Drag Ur World, Manors, Lemuria, Losing Sleep and T-Shirt Weather. I’m working on a spring issue.

There’s a forthcoming podcast with stumblingandburbling. Trying to edit it in Audacity actually was making me nauseous so I stopped and I’ve been too afraid to finish it but I’m going to, so Ben and I can be stars. 

There’s also a blog on there that I made. No disrespect to tumblr, I just wanted to try something where I didn’t know how many people were paying attention, in an effort to stop caring whether or not people are paying attention. 

It has nothing fancy like jscript or cool fonts because I don’t know how to do that yet. It’s probably not even pleasing to the eye because the font is huge and I don’t really know how much padding the human eye likes. But check it out and maybe do something similar yourself. 

Apropos of nothing, I found this article really well-verbalized a lot of concerns I have from my lonely mailroom about “the way things are” and if you haven’t read it yet, you should. From an earlier interview with the writer of the piece, Anne Elizabeth Moore:

That “funding cool stuff” argument I think is bit of a load of crap, because these “cool” companies may well be funding stuff that would not otherwise have happened, but there’s a really good chance that something interesting — although not sponsored — would have happened in its stead. I mean, from an artistic standpoint, I do have to say, a lot of these companies come in and fund this stuff, right, but they don’t find the best person to do it, they find the best self-promoter to do it, because they are lazy and so their job is that much easier later, and because they don’t want to actually find someone super talented, they just want to find someone, because this is not an event about merit, it’s an event about branding. And then what do we end up with? A “cool” company funding some crappy event that, true, might not otherwise have happened. And then, looking at it a little more deeply, often that someone they find resembles what the corporate world will think of as “edgy”: maybe a straight white male, right — but one with tattoos. At least that’s the way it often goes down here in Chicago. That’s the guy that gets offered the deal. So the whole thing quickly perpetuates the sexist and racist stuff we see coming out of corporate media, but now it’s in the real world. It’s just as staged, though.

Lol wait the zine isn’t working give me a sec.

3:04pm
12 notes

Receiving Room →

Hey. I made this website, like, totally by hand or something. I’ve even been uploading my files using SSH in the Linux Command Line and I feel like a hacker.

It has a zine I finished in January with the help of seanhaughton called Receiving Room. It has interviews with Drag Ur World, Manors, Lemuria, Losing Sleep and T-Shirt Weather. I’m working on a spring issue.

There’s a forthcoming podcast with stumblingandburbling. Trying to edit it in Audacity actually was making me nauseous so I stopped and I’ve been too afraid to finish it but I’m going to, so Ben and I can be stars. 

There’s also a blog on there that I made. No disrespect to tumblr, I just wanted to try something where I didn’t know how many people were paying attention, in an effort to stop caring whether or not people are paying attention. 

It has nothing fancy like jscript or cool fonts because I don’t know how to do that yet. It’s probably not even pleasing to the eye because the font is huge and I don’t really know how much padding the human eye likes. But check it out and maybe do something similar yourself. 

Apropos of nothing, I found this article really well-verbalized a lot of concerns I have from my lonely mailroom about “the way things are” and if you haven’t read it yet, you should. From an earlier interview with the writer of the piece, Anne Elizabeth Moore:

That “funding cool stuff” argument I think is bit of a load of crap, because these “cool” companies may well be funding stuff that would not otherwise have happened, but there’s a really good chance that something interesting — although not sponsored — would have happened in its stead. I mean, from an artistic standpoint, I do have to say, a lot of these companies come in and fund this stuff, right, but they don’t find the best person to do it, they find the best self-promoter to do it, because they are lazy and so their job is that much easier later, and because they don’t want to actually find someone super talented, they just want to find someone, because this is not an event about merit, it’s an event about branding. And then what do we end up with? A “cool” company funding some crappy event that, true, might not otherwise have happened. And then, looking at it a little more deeply, often that someone they find resembles what the corporate world will think of as “edgy”: maybe a straight white male, right — but one with tattoos. At least that’s the way it often goes down here in Chicago. That’s the guy that gets offered the deal. So the whole thing quickly perpetuates the sexist and racist stuff we see coming out of corporate media, but now it’s in the real world. It’s just as staged, though.

March 6, 2014 at 4:31pm
11 notes
Reblogged from helgapatakii
helgapatakii:

Trashy is playing a show…

so come see me slam on an instrument and scream about being a slut… and reblog this if youre in nola? ty

I like this flier for a few reasons, not the least of which the photographer is credited. Also, Trashy lives!

helgapatakii:

Trashy is playing a show…

so come see me slam on an instrument and scream about being a slut… and reblog this if youre in nola? ty

I like this flier for a few reasons, not the least of which the photographer is credited. Also, Trashy lives!